…keep a door or window open

I believe we are all flooded with creative ideas, many of which we  ignore.  If you want the ideas to continue coming, “keep a door or window open.”  Show appreciation by writing them down and following through on at least a few of them.  Sometimes, it’s an idea whose time has come…if you don’t express it, someone else is going to.  Other times, it’s part of your own growth and the ideas flow in to support your personal process.

Don’t ignore them.

As you make the commitment to pursue your creative interests and gifts,  you are initiating a flow of energy in support of this pledge.

For example, if you practice drawing and painting birds, new ideas on how to draw and paint birds are going to come to mind.  The mind is relational…it is always looking to connect the dots of our thoughts.  And to instigate something unique to you.

Realizing this, why not then employ the mind?  Why not send it in the direction of your inspiration?  If painting birds isn’t your thing, then what is?

In case you haven’t noticed, for me it’s drawing and painting faces.  I often have an idea in mind that I can’t wait to try out.  Whether the idea succeeds or doesn’t is irrelevant.  There are no failures. I am acquiring knowledge based in practice and exploration.

The universe is going to regale you with more than enough creative ideas.  Showing your dedication to the process puts you in that inspirational flow.  There is going to be more and more.  This is the key to abundant creativity–to be open, curious, then write, paint or make it–this leads to endless discovery and renewed inspiration.

Creative Prompt:
Don’t take my word for it.  Try it yourself. What are you committed to conquering in your art, poetry or other creative pursuit?

face1

 

 

 

Art Journaling

I am relatively new to the arena of Art Journaling.transformation.

Why it works…

An art journal is a haven to practice new techniques.  You don’t have to share it with anyone if you don’t want to.  It is your place to play, learn and grow your creative self. It works best if you make a commitment to show up to the pages, regularly.  Within these pages, you have freedom and any theme can be explored.

****

I knew that I wanted to create in an art journal, but I didn’t know how to begin.  There are a multitude of online art journaling classes these days.  YouTube videos galore from different artists, introduce the curious to the world of art journaling.  Taking a few of these classes helped me to create the above journal spread at the top of this blog page.

Sometimes, there is the sense that creating art like this is time wasted.  For me, it is time found.  When I steal away and take a creative moment, I find that I’m refreshed, rejuvenated and ready to tackle what is next on the never-ending to-do list. Plus, I may learn a new technique or two that I can integrate into my painting beyond the journal.

Creative Prompt:
My words alone won’t convince you of the benefits found in art journaling.  I invite you to try it for yourself. Below is a youtube video illustrating Ivy Newports Intuitive Painting Process.  The video is three minutes long.  What do you notice about her color choices, the tools that she uses to paint (i.e. a credit card, stamps, stencils, brushes) and how images emerge from the background?  Are you intrigued by this process?

Alice

Scan_20160308 (2)
Too Small Alice

This drawing is my copycat drawing based on
an original illustration by Sir John Tenniel
and then water-colorized by me.

****

Some stories are timeless.  When you were young, did someone read to you from the classic tale, Alice in Wonderland?  Or, did you pick up the book and read the story yourself on a rainy Sunday afternoon? Perhaps you’ve seen one of the many film versions of Alice in Wonderland.

A few years ago, artist Jane Davenport offered an online watercolor painting class, Wonderland.  I had no experience with watercolor painting.  This seemed like a fun way to get my feet wet.

I also decided to read the book, Alice in Wonderland, from start to finish. I am certain that reading this book in present time, I had greater comprehension than when I read excerpts in the past.  That is the thing about some stories, they have the capacity to reveal something new when viewed from a different vantage point of age.

Have you found this to be true?

****

I wonder what gives a story this timeless quality.  As a writer, does one set out with the intention to create a classic tale that spans generations?  What do you think?
I believe that a person writes for the love of writing, an inner drive, compelling inspiration, his/her own particular circumstances and the outer stimulus of the times. Add to this their commitment to follow this particular tantalizing muse.

How could Lewis Carroll have imagined that his story would leap across continents and into our present time?

feel it’s important to note that Sir John Tenniel’s original illustrations bonded with Carroll’s words in such a way as to pop the story off the pages.  When I think of Alice in Wonderland, I see Sir John Tenniel’s “Alice”.

Note: This classic tale has had many illustrators over time.

WRITING PROMPT:
The quote below, from Alice in Wonderland, is a popular, often quoted one.  Applying this to writing, isn’t it an advantage for a writer to stay open to where the flow of thoughts, words and emotions want to take him/her–that is, not knowing where they want to go? If you have a goal in mind for your writing, how do you react when your writing wants to go in another direction?  How can you align with your goal and yet stay open to rerouting?

“Would you tell me please, which way I ought to go from here?”

“That depends a good deal on where you want to get to,” said the cat.

“I don’t know where,” said Alice

“Then it doesn’t matter which way you go,” said the cat.

 

Living a Writer’s Life

You have an idea of something you want to write.  You feel inspired, even passionate.
You begin writing.  You are in the “zone.”  Your writing seems to flow and take on a life of its own.  The words pour out of you onto the page.  At times, it feels like the words are coming from somewhere outside of you.  That they aren’t even your words but are coming from a supra-conscious source.  Sort of spooky when you think about it.  How can you possibly even know some of the things you are writing about?

You have tapped into the greater subconscious.  The famed Swiss psychoanalyst, Carl Jung, termed this phenomena, supra-conscious or the greater unconscious mind or the universal mind.  This mind contains all the wisdom of the human race throughout time.

Your muse has given you the initial inspiration and you have fearlessly followed her lead.  Congratulations. Because you have been the willing scribe, showing up with pen and paper, this is your reward.  To arrive at this flow and ease with your writing takes COMMITMENT, showing up to your personally designed writing practice regularly.

Anyone who has a dedicated pursuit, creative or otherwise, has made a COMMITMENT. For some this is a dreaded word.  For others, it is a way of life and a path to deepening connection to oneself and to one’s writing practice.  Practice leads to improvement and growth in whatever area you seek to excel in.

WRITING PROMPT

Let’s take a brief look at the role that writing has played in  your life so far.  Give yourself a good amount of time with this writing prompt–at least thirty minutes to an hour.  In your journal, write your responses to the following questions:

  1.  Over the course of your life, what types of writing have you done?  This could include letter writing, email writing, journal writing, writing for newspapers or periodicals, poetry, essays, technical writing, fiction, non-fiction, anything.  Texting–does that count?
  2. Do you presently have a writing practice?  If so, do you write daily, weekly, less than weekly?
  3. Have you set aside a specific time of the day to write?  If so, what time of the day   and how long do you typically write?
  4. Do you have a writing goal?  Be specific and detailed in describing this goal.
  5. How do you feel when you hear the word commitment?
  6. Have you or are you prepared to make this commitment to your writing?
  7. Describe what this commitment to your writing would look like.  Give details.  You could begin with a description of your writing space.

Take time to consider each of these questions and any others that might arise during this process.  This is about you, for you and therefore  you get to speak the truth in your journal without consequence.

WRITING TIP

Giving yourself a compassionate and doable writing practice is based upon your other life commitments at this time.  If you have a life outside of writing, a “regular” job, others depending upon you, it isn’t practical to lock yourself away for any great length of time to write.  To be successful, it is important to design your writing practice within the context of your daily life.  A few things that are essential to establishing your writing practice are:

  • A designated writing space
  • A dedicated practice, whether it be daily, three times a week or more…you decide
  • A designated time of day to write
  • A designated length of time to write
  • Informing everyone you live with that this is your time to write and it has to be respected
  • Letting your circle of people outside your home know that you won’t be answering the telephone, checking emails or texting during this time
  • Note:  You have to respect this time to write if you expect others to respect it.

These are some of the steps necessary to begin to live a Writer’s Life.