Put the Kettle On

This snowy morning, I rise and one of the first things that I do is to put the kettle on. I had the fleeting thought that people throughout time and in present time likely do the same thing. Whether it’s placed on an electric or gas burner, on a campfire, on a woodstove or whichever, I’m sharing a tradition that people have done ever since the discovery of fire!

“Honey, put the kettle on.” Sometimes that translates to a coffee maker or an electric teapot. However, it signifies a ritual that we share and understand cross-culturally and around the globe. It’s a unifying ritual.

In the morning, this morning, I take my cup of tea and return to bed, placing the teacup on the nightstand beside the bed. I place my notepad on the pillow on my lap. I take a smooth writing gel pen and I write. I write to clear a space. I write freely anything that comes to mind, the pen to the page. Expressing something in this way moves stuck energy. It doesn’t involve a thought process. This and my morning cup of tea are helpful and healthy morning rituals.

Any feelings that rise, I give them recognition as Rumi suggests in one of his poems, The Guest House.

The Guest House

This being human is a guest house.
Every morning a new arrival.

A joy, a depression, a meanness,
some momentary awareness comes
as an unexpected visitor.

Welcome and entertain them all!
Even if they’re a crowd of sorrows,
who violently sweep your house
empty of its furniture,
still, treat each guest honorably.
He may be clearing you out
for some new delight.

The dark thought, the shame, the malice,
meet them at the door laughing,
and invite them in.

Be grateful for whoever comes,
because each has been sent
as a guide from beyond.
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This morning, I feel a low-grade anger and wonder if anyone else wakes up with this feeling. I don’t want to analyze it, only recognize that it’s there. Gently. With my pen, I catch the thread of feelings, the inner unrest and pen them to this paper. The paper has become the container over the years for that which puzzles, troubles or tantalizes me. The paper–the scads of journals collected over the years, my personal texts–the sacred texts that chronicle this woman’s inner and outer pilgrimage. There is a certain irony…I want to write a book. These cumbersome and unwieldy journals tell my story. It has been harrowing, wending, winding, convoluted, gone forwards, backwards and sideways, inward, outward and upside down.

My confidantes, these journals when none others can be so present and non-judging. Gratitude for writing, for the journal and for today.
So, that is sometimes the way I begin my day. I do love beginnings.

I wished the mailman a Happy New Year yesterday.
He said “We’ll see.”
I said “I guess that we will.”
He answered: “Let’s see what unfolds.”
I agreed…”and then flow with it.”

So happy new year to my readers. May your new year unfold in a loving way. May you find the rituals that support your being. And may we discover more unifying rituals across the earth.

Free Writing and Then, DO YOUR RESEARCH

Let go on the page, fly free, get it all down, follow the flow.  What fun!

However, ultimately, even if it is a personal experience that you are writing about, you’re going to have to do your research.  There are so many resources out there on virtually everything.  Often, you don’t have to leave your computer desk to gather what you need to flesh out your writing. But then, how boring that can be–spending more time with Mr. Google.

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One summer day, when my daughters were young, I thought we should find out whatever we could about, of all things, Sasquatch.  We lived in San Francisco, the beautiful big city by the bay.  Our chances of encountering a Sasquatch (who prefers deep forested areas far away from humans), were slim. Unless BIG FOOT suddenly craved salty air and the ocean, we weren’t likely to have a personal encounter.

Regardless, for some unrecalled reason, (maybe we had just seen the film Harry and the Hendersons) we began our expedition. We took the BART train to the old San Francisco Public Library on Larkin Street in the Civic Center to research Sasquatch.   Arriving at the library, we were faced with volumes and volumes of books, floors, stairs, elevators, the smell of old books…indescribable.  In those days, we looked through card catalogues and jotted down Dewey Decimal Numbers, book titles, authors and anything with the words Bigfoot or Yeti or Sasquatch.  We gathered and stacked books on a table and leafed through them, finding photos, the stories of personal encounters, descriptions, etc.  Afterwards, we knew a little more about Sasquatch and our city library .

The point being, when you are researching, certainly, you can stay home at your computer desk and discover tons of things.  However, why not find a way to make whatever you are researching into some sort of expedition. Why not? You don’t have time?  We think that, but is it true?

Julia Cameron in her book, The Artist Way, talks about the Artist Date.  The purpose is virtually not to have a plan other than enjoyment and an openness to discovery.  The outcome is that it gives you a break and refreshes your creativity.  It’s best to let Julia explain the Artist Date below.

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While my suggestion for an expedition is more intentional, as you do your research, you can engage an Artist Date openness to delight and the spirit of adventure. Remember, you don’t have to do it all in a day–unless you are on a deadline, I encourage bringing fun and leisure into your expedition.

So no writing prompt today.  Find time to go on a research expedition for something that you are writing (or an Artist Date, or both).

See what there is to discover!