Writing Your Prayer

Writers write.  They write in their journals.  They write letters, stories, poetry, questions, lists; they write about curiosities, experiences, circumstances, politics, religion, sex, love, doubts, fears, hopes and dreams, you name it.  They write it all down. This gives them a bit of relief not to have things rattling around in their heads. Writing something down, preferably in a journal or in a notebook, they collect their creative ideas, often on a scrap piece of paper.

Lately, we’ve seen on the news, read about and experienced all sorts of natural disasters wreaking havoc across our planet.  And we are witnessing political games gone awry in our own and other counties.  Within ourselves and our families, there is hurt and uncertainty, growing pains, grief.

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In addition to what I do creatively, I turn to prayer. And I find that sometimes, writing down a prayer, a petition, a request to a Higher Power helps me to let go of where I feel powerless…that surrender to a higher wisdom with the greater good in mind. Surrender is rarely easy, but once I truly give something over, I do feel a lightening of sorts.

How to write your prayer? No one can tell you how to write your personal prayer. I won’t try…I’ll only invite you to write one that truly reflects who you are and what you feel, need and desire in these times–for yourself, others, the earth.

The Eagle is a prayer-poem written by Joy Harjo. I memorized this poem many years ago.  It begins:
“To pray, you open your whole self to the sky to the earth to the sun to the moon
to one whole voice that is you and know that there is more that you can’t see, can’t hear, can’t know except in moments steadily growing and languages that aren’t always sound but other circles of motion.”

Have a peaceful day.

Being Alright With Looking Foolish!

IMG_9111This blog and the two following indirectly touch on the subject of  VULNERABILITY.  For when you share your work–painting, poetry, prose, thoughts, woodwork, sculpture, write a blog, etc., you are being vulnerable.

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It was deep winter in the mountains. An elder friend was in hospice care, settled in a home further north of where I live. The roads were impassable.

While I longed to visit her, I didn’t want to put myself in jeopardy.  Instead, I painted, not knowing where I would go or what needed expression.  Before long, I found myself painting with my fingers…and, of all things, a pink cow!  To this day, I don’t know why I was compelled to paint a pink cow using my fingers.  The tactile experience of painting with my fingers seemed essential.  This creative process helped me to transform the feeling of helplessness in regards to being unable to visit my friend.

Why did this help?  I don’t have an answer.  Some things really do dwell in the mystery or the deep unconscious and cannot be fathomed.  Perhaps they are before words.

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Poetry has also provided this sort of harmonizing effect for me.  When my father-in-law was dying, I turned to poetry.  Trying to understand my relationship with my parents or to make some sense of a long-term marriage that was ending, I turned to poetry.  Journal writing has been invaluable to me when facing life’s incongruities.  However, like painting, poetry has a way of containing wayward emotions while transforming them.

WRITING PROMPT:
For your journal:  Has art and/or writing and poetry helped you to express, uplift or in some way transform your difficult feelings?  Can you tolerate looking foolish in order to express and then share something that is deeply felt?

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Vulnerability sounds like truth and feels like courage.
Truth and courage aren’t always comfortable, but they’re never weakness.”
Brene Brown, Researcher, Story-Teller, Author, Lecturer

The Suffragettes

Women’s right to vote in England and the USA was hard fought and “won” in the early 1900’s.  My mother was born in 1920, the year women won the vote in the USA.  The way that my mother lived her life, you would never have guessed that she was a “free woman”.

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As a young adult woman, my life was busy with family, husband, pets, house, job, volunteer time and the unexpected.  One such overwhelming day, I wasn’t sure if I was going to get around to voting.  My teenage daughter reminded me of the suffragettes and their long, arduous battle for women’s right to vote.  That was it.  I voted and never again considered if I had the time to exercise this right which is also a privilege.

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I’ve been a “voiceless” woman and witnessed many others.  It was through journal writing that I expressed my inner private world.  And even there, I felt wrong for having thoughts that were considered “outside the box” of a woman’s entitlement.  The first time that I ventured out to read my poetry in public, I heard my own voice echoed by other women in this writer’s circle.  In our shared words, we reflected the restrictions and the timidity we felt in being a woman with a voice. Our true expression felt counter to either our familial, religious or societal upbringing. Writing poetry or prose that reflected our true thoughts and feelings was scary.  Sharing it publicly felt risky.  Yes, even living in America.

Writing Prompt:
For your journal:
As a woman, have you felt restricted or curtailed in your self-expression? Has this changed for you?  If so, how?

As a man, are there women in your life who seem to feel inhibited when it comes to self-expression (through writing or otherwise)?  Have you been an encouraging force in their lives?

 

 

Tuning In

When I write in my journal, I am usually trying to get to something deeper than “life on the surface.”  I’m expressing while questing.

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According to author, Angeles Arrien, “The muses call us to live our lives with integrity and devotion to their chorus of inspiration.  Above, all, the symbol of the muse invites us to be resourceful in daily life.”

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Writing Prompt:
Think of one area of your artist’s life which seems dry, non-productive or unsatisfying in some way.  In your journal, write about this in detail.  Create a written dialogue between yourself and  your muse inquiring as to how you can be more creative in response to this particular issue.  Ask your muse what resources are available to assist you now.  Listen and write down the response.  Take as much time as you need for this exercise.  Sometimes, you ask the question, walk away from it and the answers come over the course of the day or week.  In your journal, note the replies. Is this something you can easily implement in your creative life?  If an action is called for, do you see a way to proceed?  If not, inquire into that. How do I proceed?  Pay attention to see if something shifts for you in your creative awareness as you bring your sincere attention to your question.

Take good care.