Forget Perfection

“Have no fear of perfection – you’ll never reach it.”
― Salvador Dali

 

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This face is hiding amidst my journal pages–a practice piece.  She looks worried…or sad…her eyes a bit glossy.  Has she been crying?  This is not a perfectly drawn or crafted portrait.  With that, she conveys something, doesn’t she?

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Several years ago, one of my younger sisters held her wedding in Lake Tahoe.  As many of the eight siblings as could get there, gathered with the newlyweds to celebrate.  When she and her new husband were leaving the celebratory party we had staged, as they were getting into the elevator, her new husband made a comment about my sister not being perfect.  His comment came across as derogatory.  I looked at him and I said, “She’s the perfect Robin (her name).”  Isn’t that what any one of us can aspire to be…the perfect you or me?  Or him or her?

How does one even establish a standard for PERFECTION?  It seems that we need to measure it against something that’s been confirmed–(the highest score) or someone else (a society’s idea of beauty)?  So to describe perfection, we make a comparison.  In science, that might work.  But in a world of variety, diversity, melange–in the sheer array of humans on the planet, how can one even begin to establish a standard of perfection?  If we consider that perfection is overrated or invalid, what can we strive for?

Ah, to be you and me, each in his/her own wholeness, what greater thing to design for yourself!

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When making art, there is the artist, the substrate, the paint, the brush and what begs to be expressed through the artist.  Art is one avenue to express the emotions that want to run away with you.  And there are so many deeply felt emotions during these days of pandemic.  An artist is able to transmute a deeply felt emotion into a creative action through making art.  The chemical response in your body as you make art is felt.  Try it, don’t take my word for it!  And please do forget perfection.

“Ring the bells that still can ring
Forget your perfect offering
There is a crack in everything
That’s how the light gets in.”
― Leonard Cohen

Dance, Ballerina, Dance!

I love to dance.  To follow the inclination of the body and to get lost in the dance.  Dance has the capacity to release what has been stuck through movement.  The dance can be flowing or chaotic or anything in between, depending upon what I need in the moment.  In fact, dance seems to be an imperative in these times.  It helps to release stress and changes things up a bit.  And guess what, the command to “dance like no one is watching,” might actually be true for some of us these days.  So do, dance like no one is watching in the privacy of your living space.  Move the furniture aside, put on your favorite dance music…and dance.  Skype with your siblings, friends, children and grandchildren, choose some favorite dance music and dance together.

Make it happen!

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This ballerina looks sturdy to me.  She reminds me of a very staunch Russian ballerina.  From the countryside perhaps.  I can make up any story I like about her.  Creating this piece came from a place of “letting go”.  I found the freedom to follow my instincts.  Try this, try that.  Yes, you can place gold leaf circles within circles beside a ballerina.  And why not add a little bird in the upper corner!  Let go.

 

Ballerina.a

Perhaps that is the message of this painting “let go” of what isn’t necessary to make room for what wants to be expressed.  We don’t always have to strive for perfection and follow the rules of what is allowed to co-exist on the canvas.  We can step outside of the box of thought around what good art is and discover the emotion, the feeling from which art arises.  Express it.

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I began painting for the first time in the year 2014.    I didn’t go to art school.  I began with online classes.  The way you get better at anything, as I’ve said before, is to practice.  I stopped comparing myself with other artists or wondering whether or not I had any talent.  I painted for myself.

So, you’re not an artist…really?  You can FINGERPAINT!  Make your own paints.  Here’s a recipe from Martha Stewart…I’m sure you can find others online.  Then paint away those pent up emotions.  Notice how you feel afterwards.

MATERIALS

  • 4 tablespoons of sugar
  • 1/2 cup of cornstarch
  • 2 cups of cold water
  • Containers
  • Food coloring   Instead of food coloring, one viewer used used paprika, turmeric and matcha.

STEPS

  1. Stir 4 tablespoons of sugar and 1/2 cup cornstarch together. Add 2 cups of cold water and heat over medium heat until the mixture is thick (the mixture will further thicken as it cools).

  2. Divide into four or more containers, and add food coloring to achieve desired colors.

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    At the least, dance it out today!

     

Practice Doesn’t Mean Perfection

I’ve been practicing how to draw and paint faces.IMG_9403

As a ripening artist, I fall in love with each painting…even when it is far from perfect.  Like this one.  Learning a new technique taught by Sara Burch in Paint Your Heart and Soul‘s year-long online painting and creativity course, I realize that one eye is larger and a bit lower than the other.  Yet, this painting captures something for me that I was having trouble expressing in words.  This painting helped me to bring some disparate feelings together.

Learning and practicing a new technique was the primary purpose of this new-to-me process.   Perhaps there is a time and place to strive for excellence (rarely perfection?) or even one’s personal best.  As I am learning, there has also got to be plenty of room for play, experimentation and error…sometimes happy accidents.

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With writing, is it any different?  Writers strive for perfection as they craft their prose or poetry.  Do they ever reach it?  Levels of perfection are relative, it seems.  For with any final piece preparing to leap into the world, the writer decides, at some point, to let it go.  This is not based solely on whether a piece is “good enough”.  There is an inner sense of completion.  What wants to be said has been said in a way that is “kin” to the writer.  In using the word kin in this way, I intend that the writer has expressed him or herself in a way that is unique, particular or inherent.  When that goal is reached, then a painting or piece of writing can feel complete and ready to be launched.

When you write about someone, you look for the dissonant detail.  Perhaps this is also reflected in your greater body of work–that you allow the dissonant details into your writing thereby,  making a work your own.  Those details–which could be seen as imperfections–mark your work in some way.  Those details reveal to the reader “your style”.  Offering your work, with all of its perceived blemishes, does make one feel vulnerable.

Contemplation:
Do you find fulfillment in practicing your art or craft?  Are you tolerant of “mistakes” as you learn? Are you patient with your development as a writer or artist?  Can you spot the dissonant details in your work that make it stand out as YOURS?

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“Staying vulnerable is a risk we have to take
if we want to experience connection.”
Brene Brown, Researcher, Story-Teller, Author, Lecturer