Entering the Wilderness with Vivaldi!

Today, rainy and wet outdoors, I decide “It’s a good painting day.”

Many an art instructor suggests that you “paint to music.”  I rev up Spotify to see what is on my playlist.  Ah, Antonio Vivaldi.  I wonder what inspired him?  Brushes and paints in the ready.  Take me away, Antonio!  Immediately I’m immersed in an intense and manic Vivaldi. I go manic on the canvas.  Then, abruptly, the music shifts to lyrical and light.  WHAT!

Do I stay with the manic?  Or do I transition into lyrical as I’m painting?  Or, do I turn the music off completely?  Guess what?  I, that means you too, can do whatever I (or you) want.  I can stay with Vivaldi on speed or adapt to lyrical…or shut the music off entirely.  Vivaldi’s Storm, at least, got this painting off the ground! Right?

 

Painting or Writing Prompt:
What does this music inspire in you?  Take three minutes and listen to this piece with pen and paper nearby.  Afterwards, take your journal and write away!  Let your writing be in direct response to where Vivaldi’s music takes you.  Or grab your paints, a large brush and a piece of 140# weight watercolor paper–a large sheet is the most fun–play Vivaldi’s Storm as you play on the substrate.

 

Art Journaling

I am relatively new to the arena of Art Journaling.transformation.

Why it works…

An art journal is a haven to practice new techniques.  You don’t have to share it with anyone if you don’t want to.  It is your place to play, learn and grow your creative self. It works best if you make a commitment to show up to the pages, regularly.  Within these pages, you have freedom and any theme can be explored.

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I knew that I wanted to create in an art journal, but I didn’t know how to begin.  There are a multitude of online art journaling classes these days.  YouTube videos galore from different artists, introduce the curious to the world of art journaling.  Taking a few of these classes helped me to create the above journal spread at the top of this blog page.

Sometimes, there is the sense that creating art like this is time wasted.  For me, it is time found.  When I steal away and take a creative moment, I find that I’m refreshed, rejuvenated and ready to tackle what is next on the never-ending to-do list. Plus, I may learn a new technique or two that I can integrate into my painting beyond the journal.

Creative Prompt:
My words alone won’t convince you of the benefits found in art journaling.  I invite you to try it for yourself. Below is a youtube video illustrating Ivy Newports Intuitive Painting Process.  The video is three minutes long.  What do you notice about her color choices, the tools that she uses to paint (i.e. a credit card, stamps, stencils, brushes) and how images emerge from the background?  Are you intrigued by this process?

“Nobody Understands Me”–Wayne White

A week ago, I viewed the documentary film, Beauty is Embarrassing.  This film features Wayne White, “an American artist, art director, puppeteer, set designer, animator, cartoonist and illustrator.”  He is a modern day renaissance man, a bit irreverent at times.

One thing that White grew to realize over the course of his career is that the artist’s expectation to be understood is unreasonable.  Art that follows the trend of having to meet the criteria of a select community or of what is currently popular is art that can become stagnant for the artist.

To be in one’s artistic unfolding,  you have to be willing to go where your muse leads.  You don’t have to have a logical reason…other than this is your current curiosity and inspiration as exemplified by the course Wayne White’s life and art has taken.

In viewing this film, it became apparent that in his later years, Wayne White shows up as an artist of impulse…he follows through on the inspiration of the moment.  He allows his creative curiosities–when he doesn’t know how to do something, he studies, practices and learns.

When someone says to me “I don’t have an artistic bone in my body,” what they are really saying is that they are comparing themselves to a standard of art.  Anyone can fall short of that standard and then think “I guess I’m not an artist.”  They have slammed the door on discovering the artist within that wants to COME OUT!

HERE’S YOUR HOMEWORK:
Watch the film Beauty is Embarrassing.
Afterwards, consider what creative expression wants to bubble up in you.  What have you always wanted to try your hand at but considered it a foolish pursuit?  Hey, try it.  If not now, when?

Go and discover!

Art Challenge TV Show

I have been viewing a former TV reality show, “Work of Art,” via YouTube.  The show only lasted for two seasons.  The up-and-coming artists are given a creative challenge–i.e., explore the theme of movement, collaborate with a child’s work of art, visit a new place and paint a portrait of a local person, etc.  The judges choose a winner of the challenge each week and one artist who fails the challenge goes home.

As a viewer, I appreciate the unique and innate creativity that is part of each one of us.  I can almost see the inner wheels turning as these artists craft a concept into a tangible work of art.  For the artist (or writer) viewing this show, there is an inspirational boost.  You could take the challenge yourself–reframe it to your own genre–and give yourself a specified amount of time to complete the challenge.  If only for the fun of it!

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There is a cutting edge to creativity.  We repeat a technique over and over again (practice and patience) and in doing so, integrate this technique into our repertoire.  It has become part of our creative expression.  We have a conquest.

And then, another level of learning presents.  A chasm of sorts, something to leap across or otherwise navigate.  An artist or writer looks for the next creative challenge.  We want to grow.

Writing Prompt:
How’s the weather where you are today?  Is it a good day to be outdoors, sitting on a park bench with your journal in hand?  If not, how about a quiet little cafe where you can sit in a corner, sip your tea or coffee and play the observer.  Writers, notice the passers-by and try quick, one-sentence cameo descriptions…the goal is to capture something essential about that person…or place.  If you are an artist, try your hand at the sixty-second-sketch and then go on to the next person, place or thing that gets your attention.  Play!

 

sketch

Whimsy

Writing about serious topics can “weigh” on a writer after awhile. Yes, even when you are passionate about your subject.  Sometimes, you need nonsense. You need to break the spell of the seriousness of life.  Perhaps you need to go whimsical.

Why whimsy?  I started painting in 2014 because words weren’t working for me. The down-trodden, restrictive cycle of my thinking was binding me to false beliefs. I was stuck within a “circle of wagons” (an archaic phrase insinuating protection, but feeling like entrapment to me).   I wasn’t happy.

Registering for the online painting class, Brave Intuitive Painting, taught by Flora Bowley, I purchased a few canvases, paints and brushes and played. However, there was a seriousness even to this play. I wanted to do it “right”. Flora’s initiation into painting was a doorway into experimenting with color craving, abstraction, layering, personal symbols, intuition, freedom and more. While I wanted my outcome to be “like hers”, my own process and style overtook. What I needed, apparently, were images…though not realism, whimsical images. In fact, to my dismay, that was all that I could paint. Each painting began with no particular intention (other than following my intuition & Flora’s loose recommendations) and before too long, turned into an exercise in whimsy!

I was slightly embarrassed to post my art on the class Facebook page.  I wanted to produce beautiful, masterful art.  Animals that looked like real animals.  Or a bird that looked like a bird, at least.  Instead, something inside of me had to paint animals that looked like they were off the pages of a children’s book and perhaps rendered by a child.

Finally, I accepted this fact of my artistic life and began to appreciate what I was creating. Whimsical art. In retrospect, this was exactly what I needed at a time when my life was feeling too serious and restrictive.

PROMPT:
So do you have some whimsy in your otherwise serious life?  How does this side of you get to express?  Through silly poetry, made-up words, scribbling, doodling, dabbling in something that you have little experience with for the sole purpose of play?  Consider how you might bring whimsy as relief into your life.

ALLOW WHIMSY.

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