Aubade

The Aubade is an old poetic form dating back to as early as the 12th century.  According to Edward Hirsch, an aubade is “A dawn song expressing the regret of parting lovers at daybreak…It remembers the ecstasy of union.  But it also describes a parting at dawn.”

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Aubade
by J. P. Dancing Bear

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A parting at dawn

I awake unwilling to admit the time
or distance myself from your warmth.
The room is nothing more than the rise
and fall of your breathing.  I slip out
of sheets into a cold hour, ready
Myself to the traffic of my commute.
For long moments, I watch and am lost,
as if I had never before seen  you
sleeping, dreaming.

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An excerpt from an interview by Kathryn Wagner with poet, J. P. Dancing Bear

“When you write poetry is there any one so-called technique that works for you?
 
I get a line or two that comes to me. Sometimes I know what the content of the poem will be — other times, I just have words burning in me, seeking a release. In either case, I hold them in my head for as long as I can.  I let them pool and become somewhat of a chant or a rhythm — something I can build from. Finally the dam breaks, they are ready to be written down, the other lines flow out. Then I do the business of cleaning up after the flood.
 
 
How has your writing evolved as you’ve grown as a poet?
 
I think the most significant thing for me is that I’ve slowed down. I take my time and therefore I don’t dash out five poems on the same subject, but one poem that stews on it.  I also think that I spend more time with the images and the metaphors — I explore them.”
 Poet and author, J.P. DANCING BEAR is the author of various chapbooks, including What Language, which won the 2002 Slipstream Poetry prize, and Blue Hand. He is the Editor-in-Chief of DMQ Review and the owner of Dream Horse Press, a publishing company.
Writing Prompt:
One thing about poetic forms is that you can usually find one to hold almost any feeling.  Write your own aubade.  Make it personal to you.

 

Haiku Haven

A friend recently said that he liked haiku because they were short enough for him to memorize.  He delighted in writing haiku that did not make sense.  He then recited them to acquaintances who were left perplexed by his Haiku Koans.

Another friend, upon waking, writes haiku as she greets the new day…it has become her morning ritual.  This was also my routine for awhile.  When writing haiku, I enjoyed the feeling of presence. The early morning was a good time to write as I left the dreamworld and entered the waking world.  I could invoke both states, it seemed.

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A brief introduction to haiku.  So far as we know, haiku originated in Japan.  Short poems, usually three lines long, haiku have a total of 17 syllables…5 syllables in the first line, 7 syllables in the second line and 5 syllables in the third line.  Traditional haiku usually contained a season word that indicated in which season the haiku was set.  The season word isn’t always obvious.  Haiku are little philosophical gems, sometimes with humor.  They can describe almost anything.  Often, they describe daily situations in a refreshing way–creating a new experience of something familiar.  It is always amazing to me that some poetic forms, such as haiku, endure.

Following are a few of my haiku–I allowed myself to veer slightly off 5-7-5 for the sake of meaning:

Springs animation
Mocks her skeletal cage
Risk taken, spirit leaps.

I’ve a perfect view
Of life through eyes that see
The world as it could be.

When summer fades to fall
As love fades into friendship
where does the heart call home?

Tea in the morning
Leaves, twigs, roots, flowers
Connect one to origins.

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Here are a few haiku from the masters:

Spring Cobalt Ocean…
Across snow-white mountains fly
black returning birds         (Shiki)

Daffodils
and a white paper screen
reflect each other’s color     (Basho)

I envy the tom cat
how easily he let’s go of
love’s pain and longing!     (Etsujin)

Divorced and lonely,
she walks to the field
to help plant seedlings     (Buson)

I climb into bed
and then take my socks off.
How lazy I’m getting !     (Shiki)

Note:  In translating haiku from Japanese to English, it is challenging to get both the meaning and the syllable count.  

The simplicity of haiku, with its ability to evoke images (and possibly a culture) in a few short lines, is appealing.

WRITING PROMPT:
In writing your own haiku, strive to “give a newcrow
experience of something familiar”.  Try to adhere
to the 5-7-5 syllables (or as close as you can get to
it).  Take a few deep breaths, get present with
your surroundings and drop into this now moment.
Write from this place.  Stand up, look out a window.
Where do your eyes land…write a few more haiku.

 

Poetry à la carte

Another Day on the Farm
© by Christine O’Brien

The pot bellied pig, Sonia,
nudged the chickens
and the dominant one-eyed rooster, Sam,
aside.
When the sheep figured out
it was mealtime
they meandered over
from the pasture
to partake.
Dixie the cow
replaced Mabel
(who has severe mastitis)
as the new milking cow.
And the female Ostrich, Huey,
ate comfrey from my brother’s hand.
In thanks, she did a circular
mating dance.
I joined her
as the sun dipped
behind the hills.

My brother froze
not knowing
how to respond
to two crazed females.

Pig.one

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Here’s the thing about poetry.  It says what wants to be said succinctly (not always, as there are certainly prose poems, ballads, elegies and other lengthy forms).  However, the above poem is brief while painting a picture of a moment in time.  There are the specifics, like naming the animals, and the detail about Mabel who has mastitis, and the action piece of Huey, the female Ostrich, dancing her mating dance.  And all of this takes place on a farm against the backdrop of hills and a setting sun.  In these brief 24-lines, feelings have been captured as well–my brother’s discomfort, my own dance of freedom.

WRITING PROMPT:
Look for a stand-out “moment” today.  Lift this moment from your day. Document it with specifics–names, places, times, something spoken, climate, whatever you notice.  Then wax poetic…that is, write your poem of the moment.
Put your poem aside for a day or two.  Review it. What crafting tool can you apply to make it more precise?