How does a poem address what is incomprehensible?

Circulation
by Christine O’Brien

The Walkaway

The Walkaway

Don’t dance with just one boy,
make the rounds–
circulate.
Play chess and checkers
card games
no dating them outside of here.

The USO–
we’re here to
provide a home
away from home.
You are the girl next door
…a reputation to uphold
no loose behavior.

His name was Mickey
–from Mississippi.
He wanted a girl
more than anything.
He was being sent off to Vietnam.

Did anyone ever come back from
Vietnam
I wondered?

He claimed me;
threatened all the other soldiers
to stay away.
But I’m supposed to circulate,
I said.
He picked me up after work,
treated me to a soda,
rode home with me on the bus,
met my family,
even loaned my dad a book.
He was scheduled to ship out
in two weeks.

Did anyone ever come back from
Vietnam
I wondered?

His friend drove him to my house.
We kissed in the back seat of the car.
Hard kisses
from him who wanted
to know a kiss
before lips grew cold.
My lips were uncertain
but compliant.
Suddenly I pulled away,
fearful
withdrew into my house
tossing him a good night.

Did anyone ever come back from
Vietnam
I wondered?

He had been so cool
on the dance floor
smooth, sexy dancer.
In his dress blues
bell bottoms
swishing the slippery floor.
I could never attract
a guy like that
I thought.

He wanted to marry me NOW!
The urgency of youth
the uncertainty of undeclared war
leading one to declare love.
I cried all the way home on the bus.
He comforted me
not knowing that I was trying to
break up with him.
He threatened suicide
wasn’t going to Vietnam
suicide enough?

I wondered,
did anyone ever come back
from Vietnam?

****
Poetry is often rooted in emotion.  The words rise to express what is sometimes hard to name let alone to own.  This poem addresses the emotions arising from a real life situation.  The underlying question being…does anyone really return from war, even when they physically return from war.  In these times, we’ve begun to address Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.  For those who are on the battlefield, who witness what is incomprehensible, what does returning from war then mean to them?  How do they successfully re-assimilate into society? How are they supported upon their return?

And for those of us at home who haven’t had the direct experience of war, how do we then relate to this changed person?

These are challenging and real themes in people’s lives.

WRITING PROMPT:
How do you personally address and write about the things that are harsh in your own life?  Do you write about these in your journal?  Does poetry provide an opening?  Have you availed yourself of this doorway into your emotions?  Remember, within poetry you have freedom of expression.  Does that help?  Remember, if something feels like too much, please seek professional support.

Wishing you balance and peace in the hard things that you face.