Printmaking for Beginners

Printmaking is not one of my fortes.  Nor do I claim to have studied the history of printmaking and the very fine artists who have taken this art to a high level of expertise.  However, I appreciate this art form.  And I can say that I’ve dabbled in it on a very introductory level.  Using scratch art scratch foam, I created the following print by etching a chosen design into the foam with a pen.  If you don’t have access to scratch foam, try using a styrofoam plate or the styrofoam packaging that some foods come in.

cafea

Above is the initial print pressed onto a piece of paper.  I could make several prints from the original press.  I used acrylic paint.

cafetime - Copy
Then I painted one of the prints with the colors of choice.  I could further embellish the print if I so choose.  

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This video explains the process quite well.  Give it a try.

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Years ago, in school, if it was raining outdoors, we had “rainy day session.”  By that, it was meant that we would stay indoors at recess and at lunchtime.  We were given an art project to do.  I remember that time fondly.  Art wasn’t given much room in the curriculum…so this was a fun break from the norm.

In these days of social isolation, you might try your hand at basic printmaking.  If you’re at home with several people, each one can make a print, color or paint it in their own unique way and then share the outcome with one another.  You can also do it individually and share it with your friends or family over Skype or through Facebook.

Take good care of yourselves.

 

Alone Doesn’t Have to be Lonely

I don’t remember exactly what inspired this mixed media painting.  Except that it was another intuitive journey and continued to shift over time.  Putting down colors that I was drawn to, seeing images within the evolving piece, deciding which ones to elaborate on and which ones to let go.

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It was a cold, winter’s night in the mountains where I live.  There was the early dark of winter and a blizzard outside.  There was nowhere to go and no friend to meet.  An existential loneliness settled in around me.  Resistance is the first response when an uncomfortable feeling presents.  Feet dug in…”I don’t want to go there.”  But it persisted and I needed to be with it.  I’d been working on a painting of a polar bear in the Arctic.  I’d been trying to paint the aurora borealis.  Good luck with that!  That sky went through so many changes.

aurora

What prompted me to paint a polar bear in the Arctic, that I can’t really say except that as I created the background, his image hovered in the painting.  I brought him forward.

polarbear1

That night of extreme loneliness, staring at this painting in process, imagining the polar bear as his world disappears, I wrote the poem that I’ve already shared in this blog earlier.  It begins like this…

It’s cold and I’m alone again at night
The stars so far away, no comfort there
Is the polar bear aware of his plight?
Ice floes are melting, does anyone care?

Painting this piece, writing the poem, helped to shift my energy.  The poem and painting connected me to something outside of myself, bigger than my small life and this moment of loneliness.

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To be human is to feel loneliness at times.  In this time of the pandemic, social isolation and uncertainty, find a way to either write, draw or paint or any other creative activity.
One exploration could involve color.  Color crayons, watercolors, acrylics, colored pencils…any of these work.  On a piece of paper, put down colors that you feel particularly attracted to.  Place them side by side, at different angles to each other.  If you are using paints, notice which colors make other colors “pop” forward and which colors recede.  Let yourself play with color.