Becoming a Painting

Another painting of a landscape prompted by Sherry Lynch Woodward.

There isn’t much to say.  Lay down colors.  Then add other colors, shapes, textures in a randomly “planned” way.  Then hone in a little.  Add horizon lines, the building, the island, the sky, water, boats, some farther away, some nearby.  That’s what I seem to remember when crafting this painting early last year.

It’s isn’t nearly “perfect”.  In fact, it’s practice.  Reminder to self:  practice is important…it’s how we get better at something.  Let there be plenty of practice as you learn something new.  No judgment.  Noticing what works, what doesn’t work, following your inclinations.  Stepping away from the painting to get an overview.  I find when working on a landscape that when I’m too close, I can’t see how things are working together.  Stepping back, ah, yes, now I see.

If I were to address this painting today, I’d make some changes.

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When I wrote the word, changes, I thought of “ch…ch…changes” a song by David Bowie.  I’ve always liked the melody but missed most of the lyrics.  Living in this time of flux and change, I honestly find that there is less to rely upon–the things that we once thought were stable are less so.  Today, I give myself permission to be flaky.

Remind me, one day, to tell you the story of going to see David Bowie with my sister–his Serious Moonlight Tour at the Oakland Coliseum.

A Painting Odyssey

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Embarking upon a journey is one way to look at creating a painting.  The artist begins with inspiration!  Inspiration can lead to action or non-action.  Preferably, it’s action.

When I take a class, I am provided with the inspiration and instruction.  And, of course, at some point, my own inner guidance takes over.

This abstract is prompted by fine artist, Sherry Lynch Woodward’s expert and fun lesson.  It is the beginnings of a landscape painting.

Sherry makes brilliant use of color and she enjoys mark-making and using tools that add texture and interest to a piece.

When I look at this abstract today, I can imagine going in many different directions with it.  I see a shoreline, an ocean, or a lake, maybe a building.  What do you see?

I also decided not to go any further with this piece…the journey concluded early because I liked it as is…the inference of images gives me a pleasing feeling.  I like the way the colors work together.  I don’t need to define anything further.

I don’t paint many abstract paintings.  When I first started painting in 2014, I searched for recognizable images in a mishmash of colors and marks on a canvas, I wanted to define an image…and quickly.  Today, I’m beginning to feel a bit differently about that.

I think that abstract accesses a different part of the brain.  The part that can’t quite see what the future is going to be.  And with that, there is a way of meeting what is to come with curiosity, acceptance and yes, grace.  Abstract, the unknown, have a unique appeal for me at this time.