The Dreamcatcher

Years ago, I wove hundreds of dreamcatchers.  It was a very challenging time in my life.  I don’t remember how I discovered the dreamcatcher…but when I did, I found that designing and weaving them was healing and engaging in a way that I hadn’t expected.  I gathered supplies, hoops, twigs, willow, waxed threads, leather strips, feathers and beads.  Each dream catcher was a unique creation.  For me, this indigenous craft held deep meaning…and they were to be shared.  I gave one to each of my family members.  A man I met had a booth at a local flea market.  He sold them, keeping a profit for himself.  What they provided for me in the moment was without price.

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Tracy Verdugo taught a class on painting dream catchers.  And then invited us to write a poem.  This poem is written around the outside circle of the dreamcatcher.

Destiny

Lace and ribbons
decorate the frock.
“Forget the dreams.
Get back to the kitchen
and bake me a pie!”
Banish your fantasy of
happy couples and
floral bouquet apologies.

Re-enter the Goddess–
no partial woman is she!
So, you are somebody
after all.
Tell us what you know.
Emergence is what you requested–
sit down and let’s talk over tea.

A wedge of lemon?  Honey?
Ah, the bitter with the sweet.
This you must experience
for yourself.

Lace and ribbons,
wedding day vows–
disguise your sovereign destiny.

 

 

dreamcatcher

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A dreamcatcher is an indigenous symbol–a web, often with a hole in the center.  It is intended to let the bad dreams pass through and to catch the good dreams.  The dreams that guide you towards your highest visions.

There is both power and presence when we create.  What is the dream of the future that you’d like to paint, color, draw, sculpt or weave?  Make your own dream catcher using collage and paint.  Are there words or poetry that go with it?  Write them on your work of art.  Get lost in this process.  Invite others to participate in making their own dreamcatchers.  Share in ways that are available to you at this time.

Stay healthy and safe.

Printmaking for Beginners

Printmaking is not one of my fortes.  Nor do I claim to have studied the history of printmaking and the very fine artists who have taken this art to a high level of expertise.  However, I appreciate this art form.  And I can say that I’ve dabbled in it on a very introductory level.  Using scratch art scratch foam, I created the following print by etching a chosen design into the foam with a pen.  If you don’t have access to scratch foam, try using a styrofoam plate or the styrofoam packaging that some foods come in.

cafea

Above is the initial print pressed onto a piece of paper.  I could make several prints from the original press.  I used acrylic paint.

cafetime - Copy
Then I painted one of the prints with the colors of choice.  I could further embellish the print if I so choose.  

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This video explains the process quite well.  Give it a try.

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Years ago, in school, if it was raining outdoors, we had “rainy day session.”  By that, it was meant that we would stay indoors at recess and at lunchtime.  We were given an art project to do.  I remember that time fondly.  Art wasn’t given much room in the curriculum…so this was a fun break from the norm.

In these days of social isolation, you might try your hand at basic printmaking.  If you’re at home with several people, each one can make a print, color or paint it in their own unique way and then share the outcome with one another.  You can also do it individually and share it with your friends or family over Skype or through Facebook.

Take good care of yourselves.

 

Where Do We Begin?

“BEHOLD A SACRED VOICE IS CALLING YOU.  ALL OVER THE SKY A SACRED VOICE IS CALLING YOU.”    a quote from Black Elk

Once you establish (for yourself) why you write–is it because you feel something or are provoked in some way; is it for catharsis, clarity, to communicate, for integration, revelation, pleasure or because you can, because you must?–from here you begin.  And, as Pablo Neruda spoke so eloquently in his poem…we write to “convey to others what we are.”

BUT HOW DO I BEGIN?  WHERE DO I BEGIN?  These are age-old questions for the new writer especially.  The simplest answer is to begin where you are with what you know. As we’ve seen in an earlier post, listing your curiosities and passions can be the lead-ins for writing something.

WRITING PROMPT
Sometimes, beginning is just about making a mark on a page…a symbol, favorite number, any letter, a scribble…MAKE A MARK!  NOW!

Phew, you got that out of the way; a beginning.

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Intrinsically, we know how to begin. We begin again and again with each new day.  That first cup of tea, coffee or juice in the morning marks the starting gate for entering the portal of a new day.  I love the optimism in waking to a new day.  I remember the old man in the beginning of the film, “The Milagros Beanfield Wars.”  He wakes up as a ray of sunshine warms his face, he gives a slight smile.  With some effort he sits up on the side of his bed.  He stands with greater effort and his breath quickens.  Stooped, he shuffles across the tiny space of his hovel, his breathing hard and fast.  The rooster in the yard crows.  He squints into the oval mirror and says–“Thank you, God, for letting me have another day.”  

Beginning signifies entering.  When you designate a time for writing, you enter non-ordinary or altered time.  It is a time apart.  This time apart can be referred to as sacred.
In this time and the physical space that you have created, there is the possibility for something new to emerge.  You are the scribe who shows up, pen-in-hand, open to this possible emergence.  However, if you don’t begin, don’t enter, there is only dreaming and dormancy.  Entering, beginning, taking the first step, we accept the invitation to write.

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WRITING PROMPT
On the next page of your journal, print your full name.  If you have a middle name, include that.  Write the date, time and place of your birth.  Write the name of the hospital where you were born (or was it a home birth–or in a taxi on the way to the hospital?). Write down the city, state and country of your birth.  What are the names of your parents?  Do you have siblings, older or  younger and how many?  Where are you in the birth order?  Write it all down.  Write one significant thing that you would like to note about your birth?

Ah, you’ve noted a few details about your beginnings.  Good for you!  Details are important to a writer.  Details make one story unique from another.

WRITING TIP
In order to feel that you can say whatever wants to be spoken, you have to feel a great degree of safety–especially in your private journal.  I recommend that you safeguard your writing.  Store your journal in a place which feels secure and away from prying eyes.  Freedom to write, at this stage, means that you are not inhibited in exploring your truths, thoughts and feelings.  You decide when and what you want to share and with whom when the time and conditions are right.